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‘I’ve been doing my job’: Judge dismisses lawsuit over ‘vicious’ RTE

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2 March 2016 12:42:08 A judge has dismissed a defamation lawsuit by the owners of a cosmetics and fragrance business who claimed that the “vicious” nature of the company was a direct result of the alleged defamatory articles published in the Irish Times.

A Dublin District Court judge on Monday dismissed the case on the grounds that it was too complicated and that it could have been handled more quickly.

The judge said he was concerned about the potential for confusion and said he did not believe there was any likelihood of success in a court of law.

A jury trial began in December, after the owners had failed to pay €3.3m to the newspaper and a further €500,000 in legal costs.

“I don’t see why you have a problem with that,” the judge said of the suit.

The suit, brought by the company’s owners in 2016, accused the paper of publishing articles in March and April of 2016 about them, with some of the articles claiming that the owners were the perpetrators of the murders of the three young girls.

It alleged that the articles were false, misleading and malicious.

The article in question referred to an unnamed Irish company that was said to be responsible for the murders.

The claims were rejected in a Dublin District Circuit Court on December 9, 2016, by Judge Michael Byrne, who said there was no merit to the claims.

The case is still pending.

Judge Byrne said the court would have to decide whether to grant damages to the company, or if it should settle for less than €3m.

In a ruling in October, the judge dismissed the lawsuit on the basis that there was insufficient evidence to show that the article in dispute was defamful.

However, the newspaper appealed that decision, and the judge was told the case would be heard in March.

“The court is going to have to consider what damages the company will have to pay you. “

“If it’s not a great deal, you’ll have to settle it on the terms you’re seeking.” “

He said the newspaper was entitled to seek a small amount of damages. “

If it’s not a great deal, you’ll have to settle it on the terms you’re seeking.”

He said the newspaper was entitled to seek a small amount of damages.

Judge Barry O’Sullivan, who presided at the trial, said that the case “appears to be without merit” and that he had not found evidence to establish a likelihood of a successful result.

The Irish Times is owned by the Financial Times Group and has been in administration since March 2016.

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